FEEDING

Below are suggested feedings that can be adjusted to fit your animals needs it just gives you a baseline to go from.



SHEEP
How much do I feed?

By using fresh fodder biscuits, it is easy to manage your sheep diet and provide them with everything they require.

The general rule is as follows:

   Lamb = 1-2 lbs. per day + 1 lb. Hay/Straw
   Ram = 2-3 lbs. per day + 1 lb. Hay/Straw
   Ewe not in season = 2-3 lbs. per day + 1lb. Hay/Straw
   Ewe in season = 3-4 lbs. + 1lb. Hay/Straw

GOATS
How much do I feed?
By using fresh fodder biscuits, it is easy to manage your goats diet and provide it with everything it requires.
The general rule of thumb is as follows:
Weaning = 1-2 lbs. per day + 1 lb. Hay/Straw
Buck = 2-3 lbs. per day + 2 lb. Hay/Straw
Doe = 2-3 lbs. per day + 2 lb. Hay/Straw
Doe in season = 3-4 lbs.per day + 2 lb. Hay/Straw
Dairy = 3-4 lbs. per day + 2 lb. Hay/Straw

PIGS
How much do I feed?
By using fresh fodder biscuits, it is easy to manage your pigs diet and provide it with everything it requires. A general rule is 1 lb. of fodder per 100 pound of animal plus hay/straw this can be adjusted up/down as you see fit.Pigs only have one stomach, so do not require any additional roughage.


BEEF CATTLE
How much do I feed?
By using fresh fodder biscuits, it is easy to manage your cattle’s diet and provide it with everything it requires for excellent weight gain, and to give your weaners a good start.
You can use varying amounts of Fodder to replace part of the diet.
A general rule is 1 lb. of fodder per 100 pound of animal plus hay/straw this can be adjusted up/down as you see fit.

DAIRY
How much do I feed?
By using fresh fodder biscuits, it is easy to manage your cow’s diet and provide it with everything it requires. You can feed varying amounts of Fodder as part of the diet, the options are as follows:
A general rule is 1 lb. of fodder per 100 pound of animal plus hay/straw this can be adjusted up/down as you see fit.

Fresh sprouted barley or Wheat grass is a great way to give your livestock fresh, natural, quality feed all year round, and you can tailor it to your animal’s requirements.
Fresh fodder can provide you with a more natural, easily digestible, high quality feed that can improve your livestock’s performance and general health.


CHICKENS AND OTHER POULTRY

Pastured

Let's get this straight from the get go.  No one, here or anywhere else, has real 100% grass-fed chicken meat birds.  If anyone claims their meat bird chickens are "grass-fed" they are not being upfront.  At best, they can claim their chickens are "pastured."  Pastured means raised on grass but supplemented with grain-based feeds.  The best pastured feeds contain flax seed though, so that improves the nutritional fatty acid profile.  "Grass-fed" would mean chickens on pasture being fed nothing.

"Free Range" chickens are raised in huge chicken houses with doors that allow access to small outside pens that are usually picked clean of grass.  All of the food and water is inside the building just like regular chicken houses.  Therefore "Free Range" birds are fed grain with some supplements.  Therefore in terms of nutrition, there is little difference with other poultry products sold in your local super market.

The same can be said for organic chickens.  Chickens that are not pastured but fed organic feeds are nutritionally exactly the same as mass produced Tyson chickens.  Grain's nutritional drawbacks are identical whether the grain is organic, GMO, natural, whole grain, or milled.

On the other hand, when we say "Pastured Poultry" or "Pastured Chickens" the birds are literally put on grass where they eat some grass and bugs that ate grass.  Either the birds are kept in very large, grass-covered paddocks where they roam at will, or they are in small pens and the pens are moved on a daily basis to fresh grass.  Pastured birds will have grazed grass and eaten bugs (bugs that eat grass) while still being supplemented with a grain-based feed that includes flax seed.  They are not 100% grass-fed, but they are nutritionally far better than any other poultry classification.  They taste better too.

But, strictly vegetarian-fed chickens are potentially undernourished. An all-vegetarian diet is not natural for them ~ they need animal protein. The ideal is for a chicken to be free to roam grasslands and other natural habitats that are not denuded. There, they consume myriad bugs and wild plants, along with their choice of plant life. If supplemented with a goodly assortment of grains, and especially with fish meal, such chickens will be the healthiest around, and live and lay eggs for many, many years. In England, where fish meal is the major source of protein in poultry feed, country farmers may have a couple thousand chickens roaming on rich grasslands; their chickens can lay for 12 (yes 12!) years, or more.

So a good mix of Fodder supplemented with either grain or fish meal is ideal and cost efficient, especially if your chickens don't get to free range at all they need a good fodder mix as listed below. Poultry that can free range can do well on just a barley fodder, or wheat fodder as they will get the extra needed nutrients from the bugs they eat.

One good mix is barley, wheat, corn, safflower, flax, black sunflower seeds, corn. This can be mixed, soaked, then sprouted, add a little salt, grit, flax seed, and fish meal before feeding! We have successfully raised our what I call, "almost vegan chickens" on this blend.






Fodder Feed & Hydroponics 
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Mary Waldroop wrote us that, " We have raised our 50 meat birds on this mix feeding three times a day, take the sprouts either at day 3 or we let them grow to day 6 grass which we then cut up into a more chicken size bite! lol We then sprinkle the fish meal, salt, and kelp over the cut up fodder twice a day with one feeding being just sprouts, and feed them. One 12 pound tray a day makes up the three feedings. The taste difference is remarkable!"